Combat Stress and Fuel Immunity One Scoop at a Time

Do you feel exhausted all the time?

Do you miss having the energy to do the things you love?

Does stress keep your natural beauty from shining through?

Premium Super Green is your answer!

  • Promotes healthy stress response* 1,2,3,4

  • Support healthy immune response* 4,5,6,7
  • Boost energy levels* 8,9,10,11
  • Control weight* 12,13
  • Improve mood and mental clarity* 9,10,14,15
  • Reclaim skin’s natural glow*2,8

 

Have any other questions?

Email: support@wellnesssurge.com

Pay less than $1.40 per day to combat stress and fuel immunity!*

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  • ABOUT PREMIUM SUPER GREEN
  • FAQ'S
  • SUPPLEMENT FACTS
  • RESEARCH CITATIONS

Wellness Surge Premium Super Green contains 7 powerful ingredients strategically selected by a healthcare expert

  • Developed by Doctor of Pharmacy
  • Backed by research
  • 100% natural, Non-GMO
  • Manufactured in the USA in an FDA inspected facility that is Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) certified
  • Save time and anergy
  • Formulated to taste delicious

Stress: The Kryptonite of Modern-day Humans

Our ancestors lived in a time where fight or flight mode ended after a day’s hunt. In today’s world, however, we have to be “on” at all times, leaving no time for our bodies to rest and recover. Chronic stress wreaks havoc on our immune systems, causing inflammation and exhaustion. The result? No energy to enjoy our lives. One scoop a day of Premium Super Green can change that!

Take Back Your Health

  • Does your life feel like a never-ending stress cycle?
  • Do you devote all of your time to your job, family, and the rest of life’s demands?
  • What about taking care of YOU and YOUR health? Do they ever make it on the To-Do list?

If not, the time to start is now! Try Premium Super Greens!

Signs of Chronic Stress

Inflammation, lowered immunity, and weight gain can occur when we battle stress over time. In other words, you feel sluggish, get sick frequently, and notice your pants fitting a bit tighter around the waist. Sound familiar?

Many people even experience brain fog and mood changes as a result of chronic stress. We all have hectic schedules and very little down time.

But listen to your body— it may be trying to tell you something.

Premium Super Green is an effective, affordable way to fight signs of chronic stress.

The Solution

Premium Super Green offers a clinically researched solution that is easy, convenient, and healthy. All you need is one scoop per day! Try this delicious powder in your morning smoothie to enhance mental clarity*, fight fatigue*, and promote healthy levels of inflammation*. Everyday stress doesn’t stand a chance against the power of these remarkable superfoods.

Are You Ready To Thrive, Not Just Survive?

Premium Super Green will help you do just that

Promote Healthy Stress Response*

Boost Energy Levels*

Support Healthy Immune System*

Improve Mood and Mental Clarity*

Control Weight*

Reclaim Skin's Natural Glow*

The 7 Superfood Ingredients

Turmeric

  • Acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory agent*
  • Promotes a reduction in stress and boosts mood*
  • Supports immune function*
  • May fight against cognitive decline*

Goji Berries

  • Contains anti-aging properties*
  • Supports immune system*
  • Regulates blood sugar*
  • Promotes skin health*

Spirulina

  • Supports weight loss and boosts metabolism*
  • Promotes healthy blood sugar levels*
  • Strengthens immune system and reduces inflammation*
  • Enhances mental health*

Cocoa Beans

  • Enhances heart and musculoskeletal health*
  • Supports mood and mental clarity*
  • Controls appetite*
  • Supports healthy stress levels*
  • Supports cholesterol and triglyceride levels already within a healthy range*

Rhodiola Extract

  • Helps relieve stress*
  • Improves physical endurance*

Black Cumin Seed Extract

  • Supports healthy stress and immune responses*
  • May help with allergies and asthma*
  • Promotes healthy blood pressure and cholesterol levels*
  • Helps regulate weight*

Organic Matcha Green Tea Leaf

  • Contains powerful antioxidants to protect our cells*
  • Supports immune system*
  • Promotes healthy levels of inflammation and stress*
  • Promotes cardiovascular and metabolic health*

Trust the expert

Adeola Oke is a Doctor of Pharmacy, nurse, Master in Public Health, and founder of Wellness Surge. After battling her own health issues using natural supplements, she became determined to create a master formula of superfoods to make it easy, convenient, and affordable for busy people to optimize their health. Her commitment to reducing the burden of chronic disease and her passion for empowering people to take control of their health led to the creation of Premium Super Green.

How To Get Yours

1

Select a product

2
Ship It

3
Enjoy

60 Day Money Back Guarantee

Sound too good to be true? We know that trying new products can be scary. That’s why we offer a 100% money back guarantee for the next 60 days after purchasing Premium Super Green.

 

1. There are hundreds of dietary supplements on the market. What makes Premium Super Green unique?

Premium Super Green is the only product developed by a Doctor of Pharmacy with years of experience treating chronic diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, and joint pain. She tested and retested the 7 ingredients until she found the perfect therapeutic dosage of each. Individually buying each ingredient as a supplement would be extremely expensive, and likely lower quality. Our ingredients are Good Manufacturing Facility certified, which means they have been produced and controlled according to high quality standards.

 

2. How do I use Premium Super Green?

Everything you need comes right in the Premium Super Green container. Use the spoon provided to mix one scoop of Premium Super Green powder into your morning juice, smoothie, yogurt, or even water. Enjoy in the morning on an empty stomach so your body can absorb the nutrients and you can be energized for the day. Some people begin to feel improvements in their health on day one, but we recommend using the product consistently for 30 days to achieve maximum benefits.

 

3. Some juice powders taste like grass. What can I expect with this one?

You’re in luck! No grass in sight! Premium Super Green is delicious and tastes like lemonade.

 

4. Is Premium Super Green safe for everyone?

You should consult with your professional primary care provider before using any type of dietary or herbal supplement, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications, or have a medical condition. Premium Super Green is not intended for use for persons under 18.

 

5. What if I try it and decide it’s not for me?

We are confident that you will love Premium Super Green. But we know that sometimes life just gets in the way. That’s why we offer a 100% money back guarantee for the next 60 days after purchasing Premium Super Green.

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  89. Rasyid HN, Ismiarto YD, Prasetia R. The efficacy of flavonoid antioxidant from chocolate: bean extract: prevention of myocyte damage caused by reperfusion injury in predominantly anaerobic sports. Malaysian orthopaedic journal. 2012;6(3):3-6.
  90. Panossian A, Wikman G. Effects of Adaptogens on the Central Nervous System and the Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Their Stress-Protective Activity. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2010;3(1):188-224.
  91. Rhodiola rosea. Monograph. Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic. 2002;7(5):421-423.
  92. Spasov AA, Wikman GK, Mandrikov VB, Mironova IA, Neumoin VV. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of the stimulating and adaptogenic effect of Rhodiola rosea SHR-5 extract on the fatigue of students caused by stress during an examination period with a repeated low-dose regimen. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2000;7(2):85-89.
  93. Darbinyan V, Kteyan A, Panossian A, Gabrielian E, Wikman G, Wagner H. Rhodiola rosea in stress induced fatigue–a double blind cross-over study of a standardized extract SHR-5 with a repeated low-dose regimen on the mental performance of healthy physicians during night duty. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2000;7(5):365-371.
  94. Olsson EM, von Scheele B, Panossian AG. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of the standardised extract shr-5 of the roots of Rhodiola rosea in the treatment of subjects with stress-related fatigue. Planta medica. 2009;75(2):105-112.
  95. Noreen EE, Buckley JG, Lewis SL, Brandauer J, Stuempfle KJ. The effects of an acute dose of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance. Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association. 2013;27(3):839-847.
  96. De Bock K, Eijnde BO, Ramaekers M, Hespel P. Acute Rhodiola rosea intake can improve endurance exercise performance. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism. 2004;14(3):298-307.
  97. Mao JJ, Xie SX, Zee J, et al. Rhodiola rosea versus sertraline for major depressive disorder: A randomized placebo-controlled trial. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2015;22(3):394-399.
  98. Amsterdam JD, Panossian AG. Rhodiola rosea L. as a putative botanical antidepressant. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2016;23(7):770-783
  99. Miczke A, Szulińska M, et al. Effects of Spirulina Consumption on Body Weight, Blood Pressure, and Endothelial Function in Overweight Hypertensive Caucasians: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Trial. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016;20(1):150-6.
  100. Massolt ET, et al. Appetite suppression through smelling of dark chocolate correlates with changes in ghrelin in young women. Regul Pept. 2010.
  101. Brown RP, Gerbarg PL, Ramazanov. Rhodiola Rosea: A Phytomedicinal Overview. HerbalGram, 2002.
     
     

Research Citations

  1. Spasov AA, Wikman GK, Mandrikov VB, Mironova IA, Neumoin VV. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of the stimulating and adaptogenic effect of Rhodiola rosea SHR-5 extract on the fatigue of students caused by stress during an examination period with a repeated low-dose regimen. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2000;7(2):85-89.
  2. Darbinyan V, Kteyan A, Panossian A, Gabrielian E, Wikman G, Wagner H. Rhodiola rosea in stress induced fatigue--a double blind cross-over study of a standardized extract SHR-5 with a repeated low-dose regimen on the mental performance of healthy physicians during night duty. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology. 2000;7(5):365-371.
  3. Olsson EM, von Scheele B, Panossian AG. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of the standardised extract shr-5 of the roots of Rhodiola rosea in the treatment of subjects with stress-related fatigue. Planta medica. 2009;75(2):105-112
  4. Tian X, Liang T, et al. Extraction, Structural Characterization, and Biological Functions of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides: A Review. Biomolecules. 2019;9(9):389.
  5. Cheng J, Zhou ZW, et al. An Evidence-Based Update on the Pharmacological Activities and Possible Molecular Targets of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2014;9:33-78.
  6. Selmi C, Leung PS, Fischer L, German B, Yang CY, Kenny TP, Cysewski GR, Gershwin ME. The effects of Spirulina on anemia and immune function in senior citizens. Cell Mol Immunol. 2011;8(3):248-54.
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